National Geographic Celebrates 125 Years

Photo by Steve McCurry

Photo by Steve
McCurry

January 13th, 2014 brought about the 125th anniversary for the National Geographic Society, which publishes the iconic National Geographic magazine. It’s hard to imagine a world with National Geographic magazine. While starting out as “a small scientific body founded ‘to increase and diffuse geographic knowledge’ “, the National Geographic Society has been on the front lines of human experience, highlighting the people, animals, and environments of our world through groundbreaking images and top-notch journalism.

In celebration of their 125th anniversary, we thought we’d share with you some fun facts about National Geographic:

  • The National Geographic Society flag has been to the moon; to Earth’s highest point, Mount Everest; to its lowest point, the Mariana Trench; and to the North and South Poles.
  • Inventor Alexander Graham Bell served as the National Geographic Society’s second president.
  • An asteroid (Geographos), a dinosaur (Leaellynasaura amicagraphica), an extinct ape (Simiolus enjiesi), several orchid species, a fish, a sea flea, a laughing thrush and many geographical features, including peaks, lakes, glaciers, rivers and seamounts, have been named for National Geographic or its representatives.
  • National Geographic inventor Greg Marshall has attached his Crittercam device to more than 60 animal species, gleaning information on their secret lives.
  • Some 4 million U.S. 4th to 8th graders compete annually in the annual National Geographic Bee.

Predictably, there are a number of promotional materials you can check out in conjunction with this momentous milestone, including “National Geographic 125 Years” book and a webpage dedicated to exploring the iconic photos and topics featured throughout the years. We here at STEM Works all have a very personal connection with the magazine and the way their content intimately connects us with the world. What is your experience with National Geographic?

source: nationalgeographic.com

source: nationalgeographic.com

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